Vox Day

“Theodore Robert Beale (born August 21, 1968), professionally known as Vox Day, is an American writer, video game designer, blogger and alt-right activist.

Day and Andrew Lunstad founded a video game company in 1993 named Fenris Wolf. They developed the game Rebel Moon in 1995, and its sequel Rebel Moon Rising in 1997. Fenris Wolf was developing two games, Rebel Moon Revolution and Traveler for the Sega Dreamcast, when it closed in 1999 after a legal dispute with its retail publisher GT Interactive Software. In 1999, under the name Eternal Warriors, Day and Lunstad released The War in Heaven, a Biblical video game published by Valusoft and distributed by GT Interactive. Day holds the design patent for WarMouse (known as the OpenOffice Mouse until Sun Microsystems objected on trademark grounds), a computer mouse with 18 buttons, a scroll wheel, a thumb-operated joystick, and 512k of memory. Day was an early supporter of Gamergate and hosted the GGinParis meetup in July 2015 with Milo Yiannopoulos and Mike Cernovich.[16]

Day first began writing under the name Vox Day for a weekly video game review column in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and later continued to use the pen name for a weekly WorldNetDaily opinion column. In 2000, Day published his first solo novel, The War in Heaven, the first in a series of fantasy novels with a religious theme titled The Eternal Warriors. The novel investigates themes “about good versus evil among angels, fallen and otherwise”.

Day served as a member of the Nebula Award Novel Jury in 2004[19] and in 2007.

In 2008 Day published The Irrational Atheist: Dissecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens, a book devoted to criticizing the arguments presented in various books by atheist authors Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dennett, and Michel Onfray. The book was named a 2007 Christmas recommendation by John Derbyshire in the online conservative magazine, National Review Online.[22] Day’s 2008 book, Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy, was a finalist for an American Christian Fiction Writers award in 2009.

In 2015 Day released SJWs Always Lie: Taking Down the Thought Police, a book about activists online concerned with social justice, referred to disparagingly as “social justice warriors”, which was billed as, “[a] guide to understanding, anticipating, and surviving SJW attacks.” The book was positively reviewed by the conservative online magazine American Thinker.

Day currently publishes a blog called Vox Popoli, which translates from the Latin as “voice of the people” after the aphorism Vox populi, vox dei. He also publishes the blog Alpha Game.[citation needed]

In 2016 Day created an alternative online encyclopedia project called Infogalactic.com from a mirror site of Wikipedia’s content. Edits are made to the mirrored Wikipedia content by only those who are granted an account by the existing editors, in contrast to Wikipedia’s free and open editing system. This was done to maintain the alt-right viewpoint within the alternative encyclopedia, views which are considered objective by Day, but which require a closed account system to be maintained within articles.”

Rudolf Steiner

“Rudolf Joseph Lorenz Steiner (27 (or 25) February 1861[5] – 30 March 1925) was an Austrian philosopher, social reformer, architect and esotericist. Steiner gained initial recognition at the end of the nineteenth century as a literary critic and published philosophical works including The Philosophy of Freedom. At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism.

In the first, more philosophically oriented phase of this movement, Steiner attempted to find a synthesis between science and spirituality. His philosophical work of these years, which he termed “spiritual science”, sought to apply the clarity of thinking characteristic of Western philosophy to spiritual questions, differentiating this approach from what he considered to be vaguer approaches to mysticism. In a second phase, beginning around 1907, he began working collaboratively in a variety of artistic media, including drama, the movement arts (developing a new artistic form, eurythmy) and architecture, culminating in the building of the Goetheanum, a cultural centre to house all the arts. In the third phase of his work, beginning after World War I, Steiner worked to establish various practical endeavors, including Waldorf education, biodynamic agriculture, and anthroposophical medicine.

Steiner advocated a form of ethical individualism, to which he later brought a more explicitly spiritual approach. He based his epistemology on Johann Wolfgang Goethe’s world view, in which “Thinking… is no more and no less an organ of perception than the eye or ear. Just as the eye perceives colours and the ear sounds, so thinking perceives ideas.” A consistent thread that runs from his earliest philosophical phase through his later spiritual orientation is the goal of demonstrating that there are no essential limits to human knowledge.” (Wikipedia)

Carl Jung

“Synopsis

Carl Jung was born on July 26, 1875, in Kesswil, Switzerland. Jung believed in the “complex,” or emotionally charged associations. He collaborated with Sigmund Freud, but disagreed with him about the sexual basis of neuroses. Jung founded analytical psychology, advancing the idea of introvert and extrovert personalities, archetypes and the power of the unconscious. Jung published numerous works during his lifetime, and his ideas have had reverberations traveling beyond the field of psychiatry, extending into art, literature and religion as well. He died in 1961.

Early Life

Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung was born July 26, 1875, in Kesswil, Switzerland. The only son of a Protestant clergyman, Jung was a quiet, observant child who packed a certain loneliness in his single-child status. However, perhaps as a result of that isolation, he spent hours observing the roles of the adults around him, something that no doubt shaped his later career and work.

Jung’s childhood was further influenced by the complexities of his parents. His father, Paul, developed a failing belief in the power of religion as he grew older. Jung’s mother, Emilie, was haunted by mental illness and, when her boy was just three, left the family to live temporarily in a psychiatric hospital.

As was the case with his father and many other male relatives, it was expected that Jung would enter the clergy. Instead, Jung, who began reading philosophy extensively in his teens, bucked tradition and attended the University of Basel. There, he was exposed to numerous fields of study, including biology, paleontology, religion and archaeology, before finally settling on medicine.

Jung graduated the University of Basel in 1900 and obtained his M.D. two years later from the University of Zurich.

Career Beginnings

While attending the University of Zurich, Jung worked on the staff at Burgholzli Asylum, where he came under the guidance of Eugene Bleuler, a pioneering psychologist who laid the groundwork for what is now considered classical studies of mental illness.

At the hospital, Jung observed how different words elicited emotional responses from patients, which he believed represented subconscious associations around immoral or sexual content. These observations led the way for Jung to develop the term “complex” to describe the conditions.

Working with Freud

Jung’s growing reputation as a psychologist and his work dealing with the subconscious eventually led him to the ideas of Sigmund Freud and, later, to the man himself.

Over a five-year period beginning in 1907, the two men worked closely together, and Jung was widely believed to be the one who would continue the work of the elder Freud. However, viewpoints and temperament ended their collaboration and, eventually their friendship. In particular, Jung challenged Freud’s beliefs around sexuality as the foundation of neurosis. He also disagreed with Freud’s methods, asserting that the elder psychologist’s work was too one-sided.

The final break came in 1912 when Jung published Psychology of the Unconscious. In it, Jung examined the unconscious mind and tried to understand the symbolic meaning of its contents. In the process, the work also took head-on a number of Freud’s theories.

Analytical Psychology

But breaking with Freud had consequences for Jung. Freud closed off his inner circle to the younger psychologist, and others in the psychoanalytic community also shunned him. In 1914, he resigned from the International Psychoanalytic Society and continued undaunted in the development of his ideas.

Seeking to further distinguish his work from Freud’s, Jung adopted the term “analytical psychology” and delved deep into his work. His most important development from this early period was his conception of introverts and extroverts and the notion that people can be categorized as one of the two, depending on the extent to which they exhibit certain functions of consciousness. Jung’s work in this area was featured in his 1921 publication Psychological Types.

During this period he also allowed himself to explore his own mind, eventually proposing the idea that there was not only a personal unconscious but also a collective unconscious from which certain universal symbols and patterns have arisen throughout history. At the heart of analytical psychology is the interplay of these with the ego, a process he labeled individuation, by which a person develops into his or her own “true self.”

Later Work

For much of his later life, Jung traveled the globe to study different cultures. He published extensively on his findings, authoring some 200 works on his theories, including Modern Man in Search of a Soul (1933) and The Undiscovered Self (1957). He also held professorships at the Federal Polytechnical in Zurich and the University of Basel.

Jung’s ideas continue to resonate today, in fields as varied as archaeology, religion, literature and even pop culture.” (biography dot com)

Curtis Yarvin

“Curtis Guy Yarvin (born 1973), also known by his pen name Mencius Moldbug, is an American computer scientist, political theorist, and neoreactionary thinker. His writings have played a foundational role in the formation of the neoreactionary movement. He is the creator of the Urbit computing platform, through his startup company Tlon (backed by Peter Thiel), and the author of the blog Unqualified Reservations.

He originally called his political philosophy of insisting on the alignment of property rights with political power formalism, from the concept of legal formalism. The label “neo-reactionary” was applied to Yarvin’s philosophy by Arnold Kling in 2010 and adopted by Yarvin’s followers; Yarvin accepts the label but self-labels as “restorationist”.

Yarvin’s work on neoreaction inspired English philosopher Nick Land to brand the wider neoreaction-sympathetic movement the Dark Enlightenment. Neoreaction and the Dark Enlightenment form part of the philosophical underpinnings of the alt-right.

Yarvin came to public attention in February, 2017 when Politico magazine reported that Steve Bannon, who served as White House Chief Strategist under U.S. President Donald Trump, read Yarvin’s blog and that Yarvin “has reportedly opened up a line to the White House, communicating with Bannon and his aides through an intermediary…” The story was picked up by other magazines and newspapers, including the Atlantic, the Independent, and Mother Jones.

Yarvin’s opinions have been described as racist, with his writings interpreted as supportive of slavery, including the belief that whites have higher IQs than blacks for genetic reasons. Yarvin himself maintains that he is not a racist because, while he doubts that “all races are equally smart,” the notion “that people who score higher on IQ tests are in some sense superior human beings” is “creepy”. He also disputes being an ‘outspoken advocate for slavery’, but has argued that some races are more suited to slavery than others.

In 2015, his invitation to speak about Urbit at the Strange Loop programming conference was rescinded following complaints made by other attendees.[19][17] In 2016, his invitation to the LambdaConf functional programming conference resulted in the withdrawal of five speakers, two subconferences and several sponsors.” (Wikipedia)

Nick Land

“Nick Land (born 17 January 1962) is an English philosopher and writer.

His writing is credited with pioneering the genre known as “theory-fiction”. A cofounder of the 1990s collective Cybernetic Culture Research Unit, his work has been tied to the development of accelerationism and speculative realism. Most recently, Land has been a primary theorist and the namer of the Dark Enlightenment, a “neoreactionary” philosophy that opposes egalitarianism and is sometimes associated with the alt-right or other right-wing movements.

Land was a lecturer in Continental Philosophy at the University of Warwick from 1987 until his resignation in 1998. At Warwick, he and Sadie Plant co-founded the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit. He is the author of The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism, published in 1992, in addition to an abundance of shorter texts, many of which were published in the 1990s during Land’s time with the Ccru. The majority of these articles were compiled in the retrospective collection Fanged Noumena: Collected Writings 1987-2007, published in 2011.

He currently works as an editor at Urbanatomy in Shanghai, and (until April 2017) taught at the New Centre for Research & Practice. Land’s work is noted for its unorthodox interspersion of philosophical theory with fiction, science, poetry, and performance art. He has recently started writing psychological horror fiction.

Land is founder of two electronic presses, Urbanatomy Electronic and Time Spiral Press (with Anna Greenspan)” (Wikipedia)

Nick Land: the Alt-writer