The Intellectual Dark Web Again

joe_rogan_bret_weinstein_jorda.jpgThis article by Douglas Murray continues the conversation about the intellectual dark web that was the subject David Fuller’s documentary, giving the term a point of origin with Eric Weinstein, brother of Bret Weinstein, the biology professor who was hounded from his job at Evergreen University for questioning leftist social justice orthodoxies.

Murray predicts the end of the mainstream media as we know it, because it tries to keep the conversation within an outdated left-right structure. He says that increasingly the real division is between those who believe in allowing full and frank discussion about issues and those who don’t.

“For any public intellectual or thinker the experience of a Newsnight or Channel 4 News studio is always the same. The evening is wrecked by having to travel to a studio where you will be given a maximum of three minutes’ airtime to correct a set of false presumptions which the presenter has already gathered against you. ‘So what you’re saying’ could be the epitaph for this form of journalism. There is no opportunity for nuance, not much opportunity for correction and very little to recommend it to anyone but the producers. Certainly not to viewers or participants. News broadcasts and political discussion shows have largely become a carousel of closely scripted talking points by people with predictable views.”

The mainstream media and the universities are hand in glove in their attempt to control what it’s permissible to talk about and what is heretical. Their audiences seem to be outnumbered by the audiences for these new media, yet they continue to have a kind of cultural authority, especially among the most educated people in our societies. If that power and authority are fatally undermined it will be interesting to see what will rush into the vacuum, and what will happen if the intellectual dark web comes into the light and becomes authoritative. Will we see the usual dynamic of political revolutions, with the outsiders becoming a new orthodoxy and behaving as despotically as their predecessors? Who are the outsider intellectuals who operate beyond these shifts in the political landscape?

 

 

 

The Intellectual Dark Web

In this documentary by David Fuller, we see a discussion of the “intellectual dark web”, a phrase coined to describe people like Jordan Peterson, Joe Rogan, Bret Weinstein, James Damore and others who are not running the standard liberal script and have been widely vilified for it. The reality that liberals these days are not doing much in the way of thinking for themselves came to the world’s attention in a dramatic way when Jordan Peterson debated Kathy Newman on Channel 4 about the ‘gender wage gap’, and she tried to so hard to force him into a position that conformed to her worldview that she ended up looking stupid.

Fuller, a former Channel 4 journalist, says in her defence that she does a lot of interviews every month and is working with a TV infrastructure that’s based on the soundbyte rather than the conversation. The research she did for the interview would have been fairly cursory, and she could have easily got a mistaken impression of Peterson because his opposition to the the liberal/left wing viewpoints that dominate the media has made him some strange bedfellows on the right.

That doesn’t excuse her ideological blinkeredness entirely, but it does dramatically show how, as Peterson says, YouTube might end up killing TV. People are hungry for real-talk and real thinking, and Joe Rogan and Dave Rubin et al. are giving it to them. A Joe Rogan podcast runs for three hours, and contains a real in-depth conversation, not a stage-managed one that’s edited for soundbytes.

The left’s response to their chastening in the Kathy Newman interview has shown once again the fraudulence of their stated values of tolerance and diversity. They didn’t pause and say, “maybe there’s a different perspective here that we need to consider.” They tried to change the story to one about their victimhood at the hands of rightist bullies, by inflating the seriousness of a few hostile comments Kathy Newman received on twitter after the interview, even though Peterson had been the recipient of far more hostile attention from their own ranks.

The intellectual dark web is dominated by white males, as is the field of outsider intellectuals that I’ve been archiving in this blog, and the reasons for that are only partially clear to me. European intellectual culture has historically been their culture and it’s under attack these days. I’m sure there are more people than I know who belong in this category who are from different demographics, but I just haven’t come across them in my unsystematic wandering through the web. When I do I’ll post them.

Terence McKenna

maxresdefault

Terence Kemp McKenna (November 16, 1946 – April 3, 2000) was an American ethnobotanist, mystic, psychonaut, lecturer, author, and an advocate for the responsible use of naturally occurring psychedelic plants. He spoke and wrote about a variety of subjects, including psychedelic drugs, plant-based entheogens, shamanism, metaphysics, alchemy, language, philosophy, culture, technology, environmentalism, and the theoretical origins of human consciousness. He was called the “Timothy Leary of the ’90s”, “one of the leading authorities on the ontological foundations of shamanism”, and the “intellectual voice of rave culture“.

McKenna formulated a concept about the nature of time based on fractal patterns he claimed to have discovered in the I Ching, which he called novelty theory, proposing this predicted the end of time in the year 2012. His promotion of novelty theory and its connection to the Maya calendar is credited as one of the factors leading to the widespread beliefs about 2012 eschatology. Novelty theory is considered pseudoscience.”  — Wikipedia

“The truth can take care of itself. You don’t have to approach the truth with eyes lowered and gaze averted on bended knees. That’s how you approach bullshit. But the truth is so powerful that you can kick the tyres, turn over the engine, check the odometer and nobody is offended. Truth is real. It can stand the test. And that’s why I went all over the world looking at various spiritual traditions. I don’t feel it’s putting them down to say that they were ineffective, because they were all great aspirations but the only real open doorway that I ever found were the plants. This works. You know in other spiritual disciplines everyone wants to go faster. They want the roshi to give them further empowerments. They want further information, postures, secret teachings, so forth and so on. Once you reach the psychedelic experience the accellerator is far less interesting than the location of the brakes. That’s what we’re looking for. We all know how to push this so fast we can’t stand it. We need a feeling of unity. Feeling is primary. So it doesn’t come out of intellectual exhortation. It comes out of a personal act of courage made by the individual. It comes out of surrender of the individual. Surrender is the opposite side of the coin of the ego ”

Hanzi Freinacht

16299369_118018438713133_1442708474160533573_n

“Hanzi Freinacht is a political philosopher, historian and sociologist, author of The Listening Society, and the upcoming books Nordic Ideology and The 6 Hidden Patterns of World History. Much of his time is spent alone in the Swiss Alps.

As a writer, Hanzi combines in-depth knowledge of several sciences and disciplines and offers maps of our time and the human condition with his characteristically accessible, poetic and humorous writing style – challenging the reader’s perspective of herself and the world.

Hanzi Freinacht epitomizes much of the metamodern philosophy and can be considered a personification of this strand of thought. He has produced a wide array of original, relevant and useful ideas for people in all walks of life. These ideas help you gain an upper hand in the new political, economic and cultural landscape of digital, postindustrial society. ” – Metamoderna

Stefan Molyneux

“Stefan Basil Molyneux (/stəˈfæn ˈmɒlɪnj/; born September 24, 1966) is an Irish-born Canadian podcaster and YouTuber. Molyneux, a self-published author, usually speaks on topics including anarcho-capitalism, politics, race and intelligencemulticulturalism, right-libertarianism, anti-feminism, and familial relationships.

A supporter of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, he has been described as alt-right by Politico and The Washington Post, and right-wing by CNN. The Freedomain Radio internet community which he leads has sometimes been described as a cult. Molyneux formerly worked in the software industry.

Molyneux was born in Ireland and raised mainly in London before moving to Canada at age 11. Molyneux attended the Glendon College of York University, where he was an actor at Theatre Glendonand a member of the Debating Society. He then attended the National Theatre School of Canada in Montreal. Molyneux received a B.A. in History from McGill University in 1991 and an M.A. in History from University of Toronto in 1993.

In early 1995, he and his brother Hugh founded Caribou Systems Corporation, a Toronto-based provider of environmental database software. The company was sold in 2000.

In 2005, Molyneux began a podcast called Freedomain Radio (FDR). He uses the same name for the website on which he distributes his own writings, hosts podcast archives, and provides an Internet forum for FDR listeners. Molyneux also produces videos and commentary on current events, and he presents a weekly call-in show on which listeners can ask questions or discuss personal issues. Molyneux funds his efforts by soliciting direct payment from listeners and viewers. As of August 2017, his channel has over 650 thousand subscribers and 190 million total video views.

In 2017, Molyneux interviewed James Damore, the Google employee who was fired after writing and distributing the Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber memo” [Wikipedia]

Vox Day

“Theodore Robert Beale (born August 21, 1968), professionally known as Vox Day, is an American writer, video game designer, blogger and alt-right activist.

Day and Andrew Lunstad founded a video game company in 1993 named Fenris Wolf. They developed the game Rebel Moon in 1995, and its sequel Rebel Moon Rising in 1997. Fenris Wolf was developing two games, Rebel Moon Revolution and Traveler for the Sega Dreamcast, when it closed in 1999 after a legal dispute with its retail publisher GT Interactive Software. In 1999, under the name Eternal Warriors, Day and Lunstad released The War in Heaven, a Biblical video game published by Valusoft and distributed by GT Interactive. Day holds the design patent for WarMouse (known as the OpenOffice Mouse until Sun Microsystems objected on trademark grounds), a computer mouse with 18 buttons, a scroll wheel, a thumb-operated joystick, and 512k of memory. Day was an early supporter of Gamergate and hosted the GGinParis meetup in July 2015 with Milo Yiannopoulos and Mike Cernovich.[16]

Day first began writing under the name Vox Day for a weekly video game review column in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and later continued to use the pen name for a weekly WorldNetDaily opinion column. In 2000, Day published his first solo novel, The War in Heaven, the first in a series of fantasy novels with a religious theme titled The Eternal Warriors. The novel investigates themes “about good versus evil among angels, fallen and otherwise”.

Day served as a member of the Nebula Award Novel Jury in 2004[19] and in 2007.

In 2008 Day published The Irrational Atheist: Dissecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens, a book devoted to criticizing the arguments presented in various books by atheist authors Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dennett, and Michel Onfray. The book was named a 2007 Christmas recommendation by John Derbyshire in the online conservative magazine, National Review Online.[22] Day’s 2008 book, Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy, was a finalist for an American Christian Fiction Writers award in 2009.

In 2015 Day released SJWs Always Lie: Taking Down the Thought Police, a book about activists online concerned with social justice, referred to disparagingly as “social justice warriors”, which was billed as, “[a] guide to understanding, anticipating, and surviving SJW attacks.” The book was positively reviewed by the conservative online magazine American Thinker.

Day currently publishes a blog called Vox Popoli, which translates from the Latin as “voice of the people” after the aphorism Vox populi, vox dei. He also publishes the blog Alpha Game.[citation needed]

In 2016 Day created an alternative online encyclopedia project called Infogalactic.com from a mirror site of Wikipedia’s content. Edits are made to the mirrored Wikipedia content by only those who are granted an account by the existing editors, in contrast to Wikipedia’s free and open editing system. This was done to maintain the alt-right viewpoint within the alternative encyclopedia, views which are considered objective by Day, but which require a closed account system to be maintained within articles.”

Rudolf Steiner

“Rudolf Joseph Lorenz Steiner (27 (or 25) February 1861[5] – 30 March 1925) was an Austrian philosopher, social reformer, architect and esotericist. Steiner gained initial recognition at the end of the nineteenth century as a literary critic and published philosophical works including The Philosophy of Freedom. At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism.

In the first, more philosophically oriented phase of this movement, Steiner attempted to find a synthesis between science and spirituality. His philosophical work of these years, which he termed “spiritual science”, sought to apply the clarity of thinking characteristic of Western philosophy to spiritual questions, differentiating this approach from what he considered to be vaguer approaches to mysticism. In a second phase, beginning around 1907, he began working collaboratively in a variety of artistic media, including drama, the movement arts (developing a new artistic form, eurythmy) and architecture, culminating in the building of the Goetheanum, a cultural centre to house all the arts. In the third phase of his work, beginning after World War I, Steiner worked to establish various practical endeavors, including Waldorf education, biodynamic agriculture, and anthroposophical medicine.

Steiner advocated a form of ethical individualism, to which he later brought a more explicitly spiritual approach. He based his epistemology on Johann Wolfgang Goethe’s world view, in which “Thinking… is no more and no less an organ of perception than the eye or ear. Just as the eye perceives colours and the ear sounds, so thinking perceives ideas.” A consistent thread that runs from his earliest philosophical phase through his later spiritual orientation is the goal of demonstrating that there are no essential limits to human knowledge.” (Wikipedia)

Carl Jung

“Synopsis

Carl Jung was born on July 26, 1875, in Kesswil, Switzerland. Jung believed in the “complex,” or emotionally charged associations. He collaborated with Sigmund Freud, but disagreed with him about the sexual basis of neuroses. Jung founded analytical psychology, advancing the idea of introvert and extrovert personalities, archetypes and the power of the unconscious. Jung published numerous works during his lifetime, and his ideas have had reverberations traveling beyond the field of psychiatry, extending into art, literature and religion as well. He died in 1961.

Early Life

Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung was born July 26, 1875, in Kesswil, Switzerland. The only son of a Protestant clergyman, Jung was a quiet, observant child who packed a certain loneliness in his single-child status. However, perhaps as a result of that isolation, he spent hours observing the roles of the adults around him, something that no doubt shaped his later career and work.

Jung’s childhood was further influenced by the complexities of his parents. His father, Paul, developed a failing belief in the power of religion as he grew older. Jung’s mother, Emilie, was haunted by mental illness and, when her boy was just three, left the family to live temporarily in a psychiatric hospital.

As was the case with his father and many other male relatives, it was expected that Jung would enter the clergy. Instead, Jung, who began reading philosophy extensively in his teens, bucked tradition and attended the University of Basel. There, he was exposed to numerous fields of study, including biology, paleontology, religion and archaeology, before finally settling on medicine.

Jung graduated the University of Basel in 1900 and obtained his M.D. two years later from the University of Zurich.

Career Beginnings

While attending the University of Zurich, Jung worked on the staff at Burgholzli Asylum, where he came under the guidance of Eugene Bleuler, a pioneering psychologist who laid the groundwork for what is now considered classical studies of mental illness.

At the hospital, Jung observed how different words elicited emotional responses from patients, which he believed represented subconscious associations around immoral or sexual content. These observations led the way for Jung to develop the term “complex” to describe the conditions.

Working with Freud

Jung’s growing reputation as a psychologist and his work dealing with the subconscious eventually led him to the ideas of Sigmund Freud and, later, to the man himself.

Over a five-year period beginning in 1907, the two men worked closely together, and Jung was widely believed to be the one who would continue the work of the elder Freud. However, viewpoints and temperament ended their collaboration and, eventually their friendship. In particular, Jung challenged Freud’s beliefs around sexuality as the foundation of neurosis. He also disagreed with Freud’s methods, asserting that the elder psychologist’s work was too one-sided.

The final break came in 1912 when Jung published Psychology of the Unconscious. In it, Jung examined the unconscious mind and tried to understand the symbolic meaning of its contents. In the process, the work also took head-on a number of Freud’s theories.

Analytical Psychology

But breaking with Freud had consequences for Jung. Freud closed off his inner circle to the younger psychologist, and others in the psychoanalytic community also shunned him. In 1914, he resigned from the International Psychoanalytic Society and continued undaunted in the development of his ideas.

Seeking to further distinguish his work from Freud’s, Jung adopted the term “analytical psychology” and delved deep into his work. His most important development from this early period was his conception of introverts and extroverts and the notion that people can be categorized as one of the two, depending on the extent to which they exhibit certain functions of consciousness. Jung’s work in this area was featured in his 1921 publication Psychological Types.

During this period he also allowed himself to explore his own mind, eventually proposing the idea that there was not only a personal unconscious but also a collective unconscious from which certain universal symbols and patterns have arisen throughout history. At the heart of analytical psychology is the interplay of these with the ego, a process he labeled individuation, by which a person develops into his or her own “true self.”

Later Work

For much of his later life, Jung traveled the globe to study different cultures. He published extensively on his findings, authoring some 200 works on his theories, including Modern Man in Search of a Soul (1933) and The Undiscovered Self (1957). He also held professorships at the Federal Polytechnical in Zurich and the University of Basel.

Jung’s ideas continue to resonate today, in fields as varied as archaeology, religion, literature and even pop culture.” (biography dot com)

Curtis Yarvin

“Curtis Guy Yarvin (born 1973), also known by his pen name Mencius Moldbug, is an American computer scientist, political theorist, and neoreactionary thinker. His writings have played a foundational role in the formation of the neoreactionary movement. He is the creator of the Urbit computing platform, through his startup company Tlon (backed by Peter Thiel), and the author of the blog Unqualified Reservations.

He originally called his political philosophy of insisting on the alignment of property rights with political power formalism, from the concept of legal formalism. The label “neo-reactionary” was applied to Yarvin’s philosophy by Arnold Kling in 2010 and adopted by Yarvin’s followers; Yarvin accepts the label but self-labels as “restorationist”.

Yarvin’s work on neoreaction inspired English philosopher Nick Land to brand the wider neoreaction-sympathetic movement the Dark Enlightenment. Neoreaction and the Dark Enlightenment form part of the philosophical underpinnings of the alt-right.

Yarvin came to public attention in February, 2017 when Politico magazine reported that Steve Bannon, who served as White House Chief Strategist under U.S. President Donald Trump, read Yarvin’s blog and that Yarvin “has reportedly opened up a line to the White House, communicating with Bannon and his aides through an intermediary…” The story was picked up by other magazines and newspapers, including the Atlantic, the Independent, and Mother Jones.

Yarvin’s opinions have been described as racist, with his writings interpreted as supportive of slavery, including the belief that whites have higher IQs than blacks for genetic reasons. Yarvin himself maintains that he is not a racist because, while he doubts that “all races are equally smart,” the notion “that people who score higher on IQ tests are in some sense superior human beings” is “creepy”. He also disputes being an ‘outspoken advocate for slavery’, but has argued that some races are more suited to slavery than others.

In 2015, his invitation to speak about Urbit at the Strange Loop programming conference was rescinded following complaints made by other attendees.[19][17] In 2016, his invitation to the LambdaConf functional programming conference resulted in the withdrawal of five speakers, two subconferences and several sponsors.” (Wikipedia)

Nick Land

“Nick Land (born 17 January 1962) is an English philosopher and writer.

His writing is credited with pioneering the genre known as “theory-fiction”. A cofounder of the 1990s collective Cybernetic Culture Research Unit, his work has been tied to the development of accelerationism and speculative realism. Most recently, Land has been a primary theorist and the namer of the Dark Enlightenment, a “neoreactionary” philosophy that opposes egalitarianism and is sometimes associated with the alt-right or other right-wing movements.

Land was a lecturer in Continental Philosophy at the University of Warwick from 1987 until his resignation in 1998. At Warwick, he and Sadie Plant co-founded the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit. He is the author of The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism, published in 1992, in addition to an abundance of shorter texts, many of which were published in the 1990s during Land’s time with the Ccru. The majority of these articles were compiled in the retrospective collection Fanged Noumena: Collected Writings 1987-2007, published in 2011.

He currently works as an editor at Urbanatomy in Shanghai, and (until April 2017) taught at the New Centre for Research & Practice. Land’s work is noted for its unorthodox interspersion of philosophical theory with fiction, science, poetry, and performance art. He has recently started writing psychological horror fiction.

Land is founder of two electronic presses, Urbanatomy Electronic and Time Spiral Press (with Anna Greenspan)” (Wikipedia)

Nick Land: the Alt-writer