Stefan Molyneux

“Stefan Basil Molyneux (/stəˈfæn ˈmɒlɪnj/; born September 24, 1966) is an Irish-born Canadian podcaster and YouTuber. Molyneux, a self-published author, usually speaks on topics including anarcho-capitalism, politics, race and intelligencemulticulturalism, right-libertarianism, anti-feminism, and familial relationships.

A supporter of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, he has been described as alt-right by Politico and The Washington Post, and right-wing by CNN. The Freedomain Radio internet community which he leads has sometimes been described as a cult. Molyneux formerly worked in the software industry.

Molyneux was born in Ireland and raised mainly in London before moving to Canada at age 11. Molyneux attended the Glendon College of York University, where he was an actor at Theatre Glendonand a member of the Debating Society. He then attended the National Theatre School of Canada in Montreal. Molyneux received a B.A. in History from McGill University in 1991 and an M.A. in History from University of Toronto in 1993.

In early 1995, he and his brother Hugh founded Caribou Systems Corporation, a Toronto-based provider of environmental database software. The company was sold in 2000.

In 2005, Molyneux began a podcast called Freedomain Radio (FDR). He uses the same name for the website on which he distributes his own writings, hosts podcast archives, and provides an Internet forum for FDR listeners. Molyneux also produces videos and commentary on current events, and he presents a weekly call-in show on which listeners can ask questions or discuss personal issues. Molyneux funds his efforts by soliciting direct payment from listeners and viewers. As of August 2017, his channel has over 650 thousand subscribers and 190 million total video views.

In 2017, Molyneux interviewed James Damore, the Google employee who was fired after writing and distributing the Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber memo” [Wikipedia]

Vox Day

“Theodore Robert Beale (born August 21, 1968), professionally known as Vox Day, is an American writer, video game designer, blogger and alt-right activist.

Day and Andrew Lunstad founded a video game company in 1993 named Fenris Wolf. They developed the game Rebel Moon in 1995, and its sequel Rebel Moon Rising in 1997. Fenris Wolf was developing two games, Rebel Moon Revolution and Traveler for the Sega Dreamcast, when it closed in 1999 after a legal dispute with its retail publisher GT Interactive Software. In 1999, under the name Eternal Warriors, Day and Lunstad released The War in Heaven, a Biblical video game published by Valusoft and distributed by GT Interactive. Day holds the design patent for WarMouse (known as the OpenOffice Mouse until Sun Microsystems objected on trademark grounds), a computer mouse with 18 buttons, a scroll wheel, a thumb-operated joystick, and 512k of memory. Day was an early supporter of Gamergate and hosted the GGinParis meetup in July 2015 with Milo Yiannopoulos and Mike Cernovich.[16]

Day first began writing under the name Vox Day for a weekly video game review column in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and later continued to use the pen name for a weekly WorldNetDaily opinion column. In 2000, Day published his first solo novel, The War in Heaven, the first in a series of fantasy novels with a religious theme titled The Eternal Warriors. The novel investigates themes “about good versus evil among angels, fallen and otherwise”.

Day served as a member of the Nebula Award Novel Jury in 2004[19] and in 2007.

In 2008 Day published The Irrational Atheist: Dissecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens, a book devoted to criticizing the arguments presented in various books by atheist authors Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dennett, and Michel Onfray. The book was named a 2007 Christmas recommendation by John Derbyshire in the online conservative magazine, National Review Online.[22] Day’s 2008 book, Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy, was a finalist for an American Christian Fiction Writers award in 2009.

In 2015 Day released SJWs Always Lie: Taking Down the Thought Police, a book about activists online concerned with social justice, referred to disparagingly as “social justice warriors”, which was billed as, “[a] guide to understanding, anticipating, and surviving SJW attacks.” The book was positively reviewed by the conservative online magazine American Thinker.

Day currently publishes a blog called Vox Popoli, which translates from the Latin as “voice of the people” after the aphorism Vox populi, vox dei. He also publishes the blog Alpha Game.[citation needed]

In 2016 Day created an alternative online encyclopedia project called Infogalactic.com from a mirror site of Wikipedia’s content. Edits are made to the mirrored Wikipedia content by only those who are granted an account by the existing editors, in contrast to Wikipedia’s free and open editing system. This was done to maintain the alt-right viewpoint within the alternative encyclopedia, views which are considered objective by Day, but which require a closed account system to be maintained within articles.”

John Waters

“John Waters (born 28 May 1955) is a former Irish journalist whose career began in 1981 with the Irish political-music magazine Hot Press. He went on to write for the Sunday Tribune and later edited In Dublin magazine and Magill. Waters has written several books and, in 1998, he devised The Whoseday Book — which contains quotes, writings and pictures of 365 Irish writers and musicians – that raised some €3 million for the Irish Hospice Foundation.

He wrote a weekly Friday column for The Irish Times. He was briefly fired during a dispute with the then editor, Geraldine Kennedy, but was shortly thereafter reinstated. In March 2014, Waters left the Irish Times, and shortly after started writing columns for the Sunday Independent and Irish Independent.

Waters has referred to himself as a “neo-Luddite” or later as a “luddite”. At one stage he refused to use e-mail and stated his concern that society ignores the negative aspects of the Internet.

In his articles titled Impose democracy on Iraq and Bush and Blair doing right thing, Waters explained his support for the 2003 invasion of Iraq, a position based on his belief that Iraq posed an imminent threat to the West due to its possession of weapons of mass destruction.

He wrote an article titled Two sides to domestic violence, which criticised the lack of gender balance in Amnesty International’s campaign against domestic violence in Ireland. Waters cited the National Crime Council report, conducted by the Economic and Social Research Institute, which found approximate gender symmetry in most measures of domestic violence and he pointed out that despite these statistics, funding for women victims of domestic violence (€15 million) disproportionately outstrips funding for male victims. Waters’ article led to a response from the head of Amnesty International’s Irish branch.

Waters also devoted much of his column space in The Irish Times to discussing the role and importance of religion and faith in society. In an interview, he has described people of faith as “funnier, sharper and smarter” than atheists. In a 2009 article titled “Another no to Lisbon might shock FF back to its senses” Waters voiced his opposition to gay marriage stating that it was “potentially destructive of the very fabric of Irish society”.

He is an active participant in the Catholic cultural movement Communion and Liberation. He has given at least one talk to the Iona Institute.

He was a member of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland until he resigned in January 2014, during time that he was a litigant seeking damages from the broadcaster RTÉ.

In 2015, he became involved with First Families First in calling for a ‘No’ vote in the referendum for the Thirty-fourth Amendment of the Constitution (Marriage Equality) Bill 2015.

aters has written a number of works of non-fiction as well as plays for radio and the stage. The title of his first non-fiction book, Jiving at the Crossroads, is a pun of Irish president Éamon de Valera’s vision of a rural Ireland including “comely maidens dancing at the crossroads”. In the book, Waters comments on modern Ireland. Another non-fiction work, Lapsed Agnostic, describes his “journey from belief to un-belief and back again.”” (Wikipedia)

Richard Spencer

“Richard Bertrand Spencer (born May 11, 1978) is an American white supremacist. He is president of the National Policy Institute, a white nationalist think tank, as well as Washington Summit Publishers. Spencer has stated that he rejects the label of white supremacist, and prefers to describe himself as an identitarian. He has advocated for a white homeland for a “dispossessed white race” and called for “peaceful ethnic cleansing” to halt the “deconstruction” of European culture.

Spencer and others have said that he created the term “alt-right”, which he considers a movement about white identity. Breitbart News described Spencer’s website AlternativeRight.com as “a center of alt-right thought.”

Spencer has repeatedly quoted from Nazi propaganda and denounced Jews, and has on several occasions refused to denounce Adolf Hitler.

Spencer and his organization drew considerable media attention in the weeks following the 2016 presidential election, where, at a National Policy Institute conference, in response to his cry “Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!”, a number of his supporters gave the Nazi salute and chanted in a similar fashion to the Sieg heil chant used at the Nazis’ Nuremberg rallies. Spencer has defended their conduct, stating that the Nazi salute was given in a spirit of “irony and exuberance”.” (Wikipedia)

“Richard Spencer is President and Director of The National Policy Institute and Washington Summit Publishers. He is the founder and Editor of Radix Journal and RadixJournal.com.

He was formerly an Assistant Editor at The American Conservative magazine and Executive Editor of Taki’s Magazine (Takimag). In 2010, he founded AlternativeRight.com.

Spencer is a frequent essayist and blogger at Radix Journal; he hosts the weekly Radix Journal podcast; and records regular video blogs.

Spencer’s publications and activities have been reported on by the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, National Public Radio, The Rachel Maddow Show, Buzzfeed, Salon.com, Vice.com, among many others. Spencer has been a frequent guest commentator on the cable network RT International.

Spencer has addressed every NPI conference and has been a guest speaker at the Property and Freedom Society, The Traditional Britain Group, American Renaissance, and the HL Mencken Club.

Richard holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Virginia and a Master of Arts from the University of Chicago. He was a doctoral student at Duke University, before becoming a journalist.” (National Policy Institute)

Roger Scruton

"Sir Roger Vernon Scruton, FBA, FRSL (/ˈskruːtən/; born 27 February 1944) is an English philosopher and writer who specialises in aesthetics and political philosophy, particularly in the furtherance of traditionalist conservative views.[3][4]

Editor from 1982 to 2001 of The Salisbury Review, a conservative political journal, Scruton has written over 50 books on philosophy, art, music, politics, literature, culture, sexuality, and religion; he has also written novels and two operas. His most notable publications include The Meaning of Conservatism (1980), Sexual Desire (1986), The Aesthetics of Music (1997) and How to Be a Conservative (2014).[5] He has been a regular contributor to the popular media, including The Times, The Spectator and the New Statesman.

Scruton embraced conservatism after witnessing the May 1968 student protests in France. From 1971 to 1992 Scruton was a lecturer and professor of aesthetics at Birkbeck College, London, after which he held several part-time academic positions, including in the United States.[6] He became known in the 1980s for helping to establish underground academic networks in Soviet-controlled Eastern Europe, for which he was awarded the Czech Republic's Medal of Merit (First Class) by President Václav Havel in 1998.[7]

Scruton was knighted in the 2016 Birthday Honours for "services to philosophy, teaching and public education"" (Wikipedia)