John Waters

“John Waters (born 28 May 1955) is a former Irish journalist whose career began in 1981 with the Irish political-music magazine Hot Press. He went on to write for the Sunday Tribune and later edited In Dublin magazine and Magill. Waters has written several books and, in 1998, he devised The Whoseday Book — which contains quotes, writings and pictures of 365 Irish writers and musicians – that raised some €3 million for the Irish Hospice Foundation.

He wrote a weekly Friday column for The Irish Times. He was briefly fired during a dispute with the then editor, Geraldine Kennedy, but was shortly thereafter reinstated. In March 2014, Waters left the Irish Times, and shortly after started writing columns for the Sunday Independent and Irish Independent.

Waters has referred to himself as a “neo-Luddite” or later as a “luddite”. At one stage he refused to use e-mail and stated his concern that society ignores the negative aspects of the Internet.

In his articles titled Impose democracy on Iraq and Bush and Blair doing right thing, Waters explained his support for the 2003 invasion of Iraq, a position based on his belief that Iraq posed an imminent threat to the West due to its possession of weapons of mass destruction.

He wrote an article titled Two sides to domestic violence, which criticised the lack of gender balance in Amnesty International’s campaign against domestic violence in Ireland. Waters cited the National Crime Council report, conducted by the Economic and Social Research Institute, which found approximate gender symmetry in most measures of domestic violence and he pointed out that despite these statistics, funding for women victims of domestic violence (€15 million) disproportionately outstrips funding for male victims. Waters’ article led to a response from the head of Amnesty International’s Irish branch.

Waters also devoted much of his column space in The Irish Times to discussing the role and importance of religion and faith in society. In an interview, he has described people of faith as “funnier, sharper and smarter” than atheists. In a 2009 article titled “Another no to Lisbon might shock FF back to its senses” Waters voiced his opposition to gay marriage stating that it was “potentially destructive of the very fabric of Irish society”.

He is an active participant in the Catholic cultural movement Communion and Liberation. He has given at least one talk to the Iona Institute.

He was a member of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland until he resigned in January 2014, during time that he was a litigant seeking damages from the broadcaster RTÉ.

In 2015, he became involved with First Families First in calling for a ‘No’ vote in the referendum for the Thirty-fourth Amendment of the Constitution (Marriage Equality) Bill 2015.

aters has written a number of works of non-fiction as well as plays for radio and the stage. The title of his first non-fiction book, Jiving at the Crossroads, is a pun of Irish president Éamon de Valera’s vision of a rural Ireland including “comely maidens dancing at the crossroads”. In the book, Waters comments on modern Ireland. Another non-fiction work, Lapsed Agnostic, describes his “journey from belief to un-belief and back again.”” (Wikipedia)