Hanzi Freinacht

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“Hanzi Freinacht is a political philosopher, historian and sociologist, author of The Listening Society, and the upcoming books Nordic Ideology and The 6 Hidden Patterns of World History. Much of his time is spent alone in the Swiss Alps.

As a writer, Hanzi combines in-depth knowledge of several sciences and disciplines and offers maps of our time and the human condition with his characteristically accessible, poetic and humorous writing style – challenging the reader’s perspective of herself and the world.

Hanzi Freinacht epitomizes much of the metamodern philosophy and can be considered a personification of this strand of thought. He has produced a wide array of original, relevant and useful ideas for people in all walks of life. These ideas help you gain an upper hand in the new political, economic and cultural landscape of digital, postindustrial society. ” – Metamoderna

Vox Day

“Theodore Robert Beale (born August 21, 1968), professionally known as Vox Day, is an American writer, video game designer, blogger and alt-right activist.

Day and Andrew Lunstad founded a video game company in 1993 named Fenris Wolf. They developed the game Rebel Moon in 1995, and its sequel Rebel Moon Rising in 1997. Fenris Wolf was developing two games, Rebel Moon Revolution and Traveler for the Sega Dreamcast, when it closed in 1999 after a legal dispute with its retail publisher GT Interactive Software. In 1999, under the name Eternal Warriors, Day and Lunstad released The War in Heaven, a Biblical video game published by Valusoft and distributed by GT Interactive. Day holds the design patent for WarMouse (known as the OpenOffice Mouse until Sun Microsystems objected on trademark grounds), a computer mouse with 18 buttons, a scroll wheel, a thumb-operated joystick, and 512k of memory. Day was an early supporter of Gamergate and hosted the GGinParis meetup in July 2015 with Milo Yiannopoulos and Mike Cernovich.[16]

Day first began writing under the name Vox Day for a weekly video game review column in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and later continued to use the pen name for a weekly WorldNetDaily opinion column. In 2000, Day published his first solo novel, The War in Heaven, the first in a series of fantasy novels with a religious theme titled The Eternal Warriors. The novel investigates themes “about good versus evil among angels, fallen and otherwise”.

Day served as a member of the Nebula Award Novel Jury in 2004[19] and in 2007.

In 2008 Day published The Irrational Atheist: Dissecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens, a book devoted to criticizing the arguments presented in various books by atheist authors Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dennett, and Michel Onfray. The book was named a 2007 Christmas recommendation by John Derbyshire in the online conservative magazine, National Review Online.[22] Day’s 2008 book, Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy, was a finalist for an American Christian Fiction Writers award in 2009.

In 2015 Day released SJWs Always Lie: Taking Down the Thought Police, a book about activists online concerned with social justice, referred to disparagingly as “social justice warriors”, which was billed as, “[a] guide to understanding, anticipating, and surviving SJW attacks.” The book was positively reviewed by the conservative online magazine American Thinker.

Day currently publishes a blog called Vox Popoli, which translates from the Latin as “voice of the people” after the aphorism Vox populi, vox dei. He also publishes the blog Alpha Game.[citation needed]

In 2016 Day created an alternative online encyclopedia project called Infogalactic.com from a mirror site of Wikipedia’s content. Edits are made to the mirrored Wikipedia content by only those who are granted an account by the existing editors, in contrast to Wikipedia’s free and open editing system. This was done to maintain the alt-right viewpoint within the alternative encyclopedia, views which are considered objective by Day, but which require a closed account system to be maintained within articles.”

Curtis Yarvin

“Curtis Guy Yarvin (born 1973), also known by his pen name Mencius Moldbug, is an American computer scientist, political theorist, and neoreactionary thinker. His writings have played a foundational role in the formation of the neoreactionary movement. He is the creator of the Urbit computing platform, through his startup company Tlon (backed by Peter Thiel), and the author of the blog Unqualified Reservations.

He originally called his political philosophy of insisting on the alignment of property rights with political power formalism, from the concept of legal formalism. The label “neo-reactionary” was applied to Yarvin’s philosophy by Arnold Kling in 2010 and adopted by Yarvin’s followers; Yarvin accepts the label but self-labels as “restorationist”.

Yarvin’s work on neoreaction inspired English philosopher Nick Land to brand the wider neoreaction-sympathetic movement the Dark Enlightenment. Neoreaction and the Dark Enlightenment form part of the philosophical underpinnings of the alt-right.

Yarvin came to public attention in February, 2017 when Politico magazine reported that Steve Bannon, who served as White House Chief Strategist under U.S. President Donald Trump, read Yarvin’s blog and that Yarvin “has reportedly opened up a line to the White House, communicating with Bannon and his aides through an intermediary…” The story was picked up by other magazines and newspapers, including the Atlantic, the Independent, and Mother Jones.

Yarvin’s opinions have been described as racist, with his writings interpreted as supportive of slavery, including the belief that whites have higher IQs than blacks for genetic reasons. Yarvin himself maintains that he is not a racist because, while he doubts that “all races are equally smart,” the notion “that people who score higher on IQ tests are in some sense superior human beings” is “creepy”. He also disputes being an ‘outspoken advocate for slavery’, but has argued that some races are more suited to slavery than others.

In 2015, his invitation to speak about Urbit at the Strange Loop programming conference was rescinded following complaints made by other attendees.[19][17] In 2016, his invitation to the LambdaConf functional programming conference resulted in the withdrawal of five speakers, two subconferences and several sponsors.” (Wikipedia)

Nick Land

“Nick Land (born 17 January 1962) is an English philosopher and writer.

His writing is credited with pioneering the genre known as “theory-fiction”. A cofounder of the 1990s collective Cybernetic Culture Research Unit, his work has been tied to the development of accelerationism and speculative realism. Most recently, Land has been a primary theorist and the namer of the Dark Enlightenment, a “neoreactionary” philosophy that opposes egalitarianism and is sometimes associated with the alt-right or other right-wing movements.

Land was a lecturer in Continental Philosophy at the University of Warwick from 1987 until his resignation in 1998. At Warwick, he and Sadie Plant co-founded the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit. He is the author of The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism, published in 1992, in addition to an abundance of shorter texts, many of which were published in the 1990s during Land’s time with the Ccru. The majority of these articles were compiled in the retrospective collection Fanged Noumena: Collected Writings 1987-2007, published in 2011.

He currently works as an editor at Urbanatomy in Shanghai, and (until April 2017) taught at the New Centre for Research & Practice. Land’s work is noted for its unorthodox interspersion of philosophical theory with fiction, science, poetry, and performance art. He has recently started writing psychological horror fiction.

Land is founder of two electronic presses, Urbanatomy Electronic and Time Spiral Press (with Anna Greenspan)” (Wikipedia)

Nick Land: the Alt-writer

John Waters

“John Waters (born 28 May 1955) is a former Irish journalist whose career began in 1981 with the Irish political-music magazine Hot Press. He went on to write for the Sunday Tribune and later edited In Dublin magazine and Magill. Waters has written several books and, in 1998, he devised The Whoseday Book — which contains quotes, writings and pictures of 365 Irish writers and musicians – that raised some €3 million for the Irish Hospice Foundation.

He wrote a weekly Friday column for The Irish Times. He was briefly fired during a dispute with the then editor, Geraldine Kennedy, but was shortly thereafter reinstated. In March 2014, Waters left the Irish Times, and shortly after started writing columns for the Sunday Independent and Irish Independent.

Waters has referred to himself as a “neo-Luddite” or later as a “luddite”. At one stage he refused to use e-mail and stated his concern that society ignores the negative aspects of the Internet.

In his articles titled Impose democracy on Iraq and Bush and Blair doing right thing, Waters explained his support for the 2003 invasion of Iraq, a position based on his belief that Iraq posed an imminent threat to the West due to its possession of weapons of mass destruction.

He wrote an article titled Two sides to domestic violence, which criticised the lack of gender balance in Amnesty International’s campaign against domestic violence in Ireland. Waters cited the National Crime Council report, conducted by the Economic and Social Research Institute, which found approximate gender symmetry in most measures of domestic violence and he pointed out that despite these statistics, funding for women victims of domestic violence (€15 million) disproportionately outstrips funding for male victims. Waters’ article led to a response from the head of Amnesty International’s Irish branch.

Waters also devoted much of his column space in The Irish Times to discussing the role and importance of religion and faith in society. In an interview, he has described people of faith as “funnier, sharper and smarter” than atheists. In a 2009 article titled “Another no to Lisbon might shock FF back to its senses” Waters voiced his opposition to gay marriage stating that it was “potentially destructive of the very fabric of Irish society”.

He is an active participant in the Catholic cultural movement Communion and Liberation. He has given at least one talk to the Iona Institute.

He was a member of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland until he resigned in January 2014, during time that he was a litigant seeking damages from the broadcaster RTÉ.

In 2015, he became involved with First Families First in calling for a ‘No’ vote in the referendum for the Thirty-fourth Amendment of the Constitution (Marriage Equality) Bill 2015.

aters has written a number of works of non-fiction as well as plays for radio and the stage. The title of his first non-fiction book, Jiving at the Crossroads, is a pun of Irish president Éamon de Valera’s vision of a rural Ireland including “comely maidens dancing at the crossroads”. In the book, Waters comments on modern Ireland. Another non-fiction work, Lapsed Agnostic, describes his “journey from belief to un-belief and back again.”” (Wikipedia)