Vox Day

“Theodore Robert Beale (born August 21, 1968), professionally known as Vox Day, is an American writer, video game designer, blogger and alt-right activist.

Day and Andrew Lunstad founded a video game company in 1993 named Fenris Wolf. They developed the game Rebel Moon in 1995, and its sequel Rebel Moon Rising in 1997. Fenris Wolf was developing two games, Rebel Moon Revolution and Traveler for the Sega Dreamcast, when it closed in 1999 after a legal dispute with its retail publisher GT Interactive Software. In 1999, under the name Eternal Warriors, Day and Lunstad released The War in Heaven, a Biblical video game published by Valusoft and distributed by GT Interactive. Day holds the design patent for WarMouse (known as the OpenOffice Mouse until Sun Microsystems objected on trademark grounds), a computer mouse with 18 buttons, a scroll wheel, a thumb-operated joystick, and 512k of memory. Day was an early supporter of Gamergate and hosted the GGinParis meetup in July 2015 with Milo Yiannopoulos and Mike Cernovich.[16]

Day first began writing under the name Vox Day for a weekly video game review column in the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and later continued to use the pen name for a weekly WorldNetDaily opinion column. In 2000, Day published his first solo novel, The War in Heaven, the first in a series of fantasy novels with a religious theme titled The Eternal Warriors. The novel investigates themes “about good versus evil among angels, fallen and otherwise”.

Day served as a member of the Nebula Award Novel Jury in 2004[19] and in 2007.

In 2008 Day published The Irrational Atheist: Dissecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens, a book devoted to criticizing the arguments presented in various books by atheist authors Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dennett, and Michel Onfray. The book was named a 2007 Christmas recommendation by John Derbyshire in the online conservative magazine, National Review Online.[22] Day’s 2008 book, Summa Elvetica: A Casuistry of the Elvish Controversy, was a finalist for an American Christian Fiction Writers award in 2009.

In 2015 Day released SJWs Always Lie: Taking Down the Thought Police, a book about activists online concerned with social justice, referred to disparagingly as “social justice warriors”, which was billed as, “[a] guide to understanding, anticipating, and surviving SJW attacks.” The book was positively reviewed by the conservative online magazine American Thinker.

Day currently publishes a blog called Vox Popoli, which translates from the Latin as “voice of the people” after the aphorism Vox populi, vox dei. He also publishes the blog Alpha Game.[citation needed]

In 2016 Day created an alternative online encyclopedia project called Infogalactic.com from a mirror site of Wikipedia’s content. Edits are made to the mirrored Wikipedia content by only those who are granted an account by the existing editors, in contrast to Wikipedia’s free and open editing system. This was done to maintain the alt-right viewpoint within the alternative encyclopedia, views which are considered objective by Day, but which require a closed account system to be maintained within articles.”

Curtis Yarvin

“Curtis Guy Yarvin (born 1973), also known by his pen name Mencius Moldbug, is an American computer scientist, political theorist, and neoreactionary thinker. His writings have played a foundational role in the formation of the neoreactionary movement. He is the creator of the Urbit computing platform, through his startup company Tlon (backed by Peter Thiel), and the author of the blog Unqualified Reservations.

He originally called his political philosophy of insisting on the alignment of property rights with political power formalism, from the concept of legal formalism. The label “neo-reactionary” was applied to Yarvin’s philosophy by Arnold Kling in 2010 and adopted by Yarvin’s followers; Yarvin accepts the label but self-labels as “restorationist”.

Yarvin’s work on neoreaction inspired English philosopher Nick Land to brand the wider neoreaction-sympathetic movement the Dark Enlightenment. Neoreaction and the Dark Enlightenment form part of the philosophical underpinnings of the alt-right.

Yarvin came to public attention in February, 2017 when Politico magazine reported that Steve Bannon, who served as White House Chief Strategist under U.S. President Donald Trump, read Yarvin’s blog and that Yarvin “has reportedly opened up a line to the White House, communicating with Bannon and his aides through an intermediary…” The story was picked up by other magazines and newspapers, including the Atlantic, the Independent, and Mother Jones.

Yarvin’s opinions have been described as racist, with his writings interpreted as supportive of slavery, including the belief that whites have higher IQs than blacks for genetic reasons. Yarvin himself maintains that he is not a racist because, while he doubts that “all races are equally smart,” the notion “that people who score higher on IQ tests are in some sense superior human beings” is “creepy”. He also disputes being an ‘outspoken advocate for slavery’, but has argued that some races are more suited to slavery than others.

In 2015, his invitation to speak about Urbit at the Strange Loop programming conference was rescinded following complaints made by other attendees.[19][17] In 2016, his invitation to the LambdaConf functional programming conference resulted in the withdrawal of five speakers, two subconferences and several sponsors.” (Wikipedia)

Ayn Rand

“Ayn Rand (/ˈaɪn ˈrænd/; born Alisa Zinov’yevna Rosenbaum, Russian: Али́са Зино́вьевна Розенба́ум; February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982) was a Russian-American novelist, philosopher, playwright, and screenwriter. She is known for her two best-selling novels, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, and for developing a philosophical system she called Objectivism. Educated in Russia, she moved to the United States in 1926. She had a play produced on Broadway in 1935–1936. After two early novels that were initially unsuccessful in America, she achieved fame with her 1943 novel, The Fountainhead.

In 1957, Rand published her best-known work, the novel Atlas Shrugged. Afterward, she turned to non-fiction to promote her philosophy, publishing her own magazines and releasing several collections of essays until her death in 1982. Rand advocated reason as the only means of acquiring knowledge, and rejected faith and religion. She supported rational and ethical egoism, and rejected altruism. In politics, she condemned the initiation of force as immoral, and opposed collectivism and statism as well as anarchism, and instead supported laissez-faire capitalism, which she defined as the system based on recognizing individual rights. In art, Rand promoted romantic realism. She was sharply critical of most philosophers and philosophical traditions known to her, except for Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, and classical liberals.

Literary critics received Rand’s fiction with mixed reviews, and academia generally ignored or rejected her philosophy, though academic interest has increased in recent decades. The Objectivist movement attempts to spread her ideas, both to the public and in academic settings. She has been a significant influence among libertarians and American conservatives.” (Wikipedia)

Richard Spencer

“Richard Bertrand Spencer (born May 11, 1978) is an American white supremacist. He is president of the National Policy Institute, a white nationalist think tank, as well as Washington Summit Publishers. Spencer has stated that he rejects the label of white supremacist, and prefers to describe himself as an identitarian. He has advocated for a white homeland for a “dispossessed white race” and called for “peaceful ethnic cleansing” to halt the “deconstruction” of European culture.

Spencer and others have said that he created the term “alt-right”, which he considers a movement about white identity. Breitbart News described Spencer’s website AlternativeRight.com as “a center of alt-right thought.”

Spencer has repeatedly quoted from Nazi propaganda and denounced Jews, and has on several occasions refused to denounce Adolf Hitler.

Spencer and his organization drew considerable media attention in the weeks following the 2016 presidential election, where, at a National Policy Institute conference, in response to his cry “Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!”, a number of his supporters gave the Nazi salute and chanted in a similar fashion to the Sieg heil chant used at the Nazis’ Nuremberg rallies. Spencer has defended their conduct, stating that the Nazi salute was given in a spirit of “irony and exuberance”.” (Wikipedia)

“Richard Spencer is President and Director of The National Policy Institute and Washington Summit Publishers. He is the founder and Editor of Radix Journal and RadixJournal.com.

He was formerly an Assistant Editor at The American Conservative magazine and Executive Editor of Taki’s Magazine (Takimag). In 2010, he founded AlternativeRight.com.

Spencer is a frequent essayist and blogger at Radix Journal; he hosts the weekly Radix Journal podcast; and records regular video blogs.

Spencer’s publications and activities have been reported on by the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, National Public Radio, The Rachel Maddow Show, Buzzfeed, Salon.com, Vice.com, among many others. Spencer has been a frequent guest commentator on the cable network RT International.

Spencer has addressed every NPI conference and has been a guest speaker at the Property and Freedom Society, The Traditional Britain Group, American Renaissance, and the HL Mencken Club.

Richard holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Virginia and a Master of Arts from the University of Chicago. He was a doctoral student at Duke University, before becoming a journalist.” (National Policy Institute)

Ted Kaczynski

“Theodore John Kaczynski (/kəˈzɪnski/; born May 22, 1942), also known as the “Unabomber”, is an American serial killer, domestic terrorist, and self-professed[clarification needed] anarchist.[2] A mathematical prodigy, he abandoned a promising academic career in 1969, then between 1978 and 1995 killed three people, and injured 23 others, in a nationwide bombing campaign targeting people involved with modern technology. In conjunction with this campaign he issued a wide-ranging social critique opposing industrialization and modern technology, and advancing a nature-centered form of anarchism.[3][4][5]

Kaczynski was born and raised in Evergreen Park, Illinois. While growing up in Evergreen Park he was a child prodigy, excelling academically from an early age. Kaczynski was accepted into Harvard University at the age of 16, where he earned an undergraduate degree. He subsequently earned a PhD in mathematics from the University of Michigan. He became an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley in 1967 at age 25. He resigned two years later.[6]

As a Harvard undergraduate, Kaczynski was among twenty-two students who were research subjects in ethically questionable experiments conducted by psychology professor Henry Murray from late 1959 to early 1962.[7][8][9]

In 1971, he moved to a remote cabin without electricity or running water in Lincoln, Montana, where he lived as a recluse while learning survival skills in an attempt to become self-sufficient.[10] Seventeen years after beginning his mail bomb campaign, Kaczynski sent a letter[11] to The New York Times on April 24, 1995 and promised “to desist from terrorism” if the Times or The Washington Post published his manifesto, Industrial Society and Its Future (the “Unabomber Manifesto”), in which he argued that his bombings were extreme but necessary to attract attention to the erosion of human freedom necessitated by modern technologies requiring large-scale organization.

The Unabomber was the target of one of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s costliest investigations. Before Kaczynski’s identity was known, the FBI used the title “UNABOM” (UNiversity & Airline BOMber) to refer to his case, which resulted in the media calling him the Unabomber. The FBI (as well as Attorney General Janet Reno) pushed for the publication of Kaczynski’s “Manifesto”, which led to his sister-in-law, and then his brother, recognizing Kaczynski’s style of writing and beliefs from the manifesto, and tipping off the FBI.[12] Kaczynski tried unsuccessfully to dismiss his court-appointed lawyers because they wanted to plead insanity in order to avoid the death penalty, as Kaczynski did not believe he was insane.[13] When it became clear that his pending trial would entail national television exposure for Kaczynski, the court entered a plea agreement, under which he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole. He has been designated a “domestic terrorist” by the FBI.[14] Some anarcho-primitivist authors, such as John Zerzan and John Moore, have come to his defense, while also holding some reservations about his actions and ideas”